Where Dreams Meet the Business of Writing

N: Names

N: Names

babies.jpg

Choosing names for the characters in our historical fiction works can be difficult. Maybe not difficult, but we need to choose the names with care. After all, if I’m writing a tale set in 1910, a female is most likely not going to have an Ashley or a Taylor, especially not with a creative spelling such as Ashlee. But on the other hand, there’s only so many Mary’s and Elizabeth’s that can grace our pages.

One thing to keep in mind is the era you’re writing in and what names were popular at the time.

Another is where the story takes place, or if there’s an ethnic background. A story set in Scotland in the 1600’s would have a completely different cast of characters than my 1930 story set in the U.S.

And – as you are probably aware of and I don’t need to point out – watch the starting letters too. A story with a Mary, Margaret and Madeline could become very confusing for the reader. We want them to keep reading. We don’t want them getting distracted by trying to keep all the characters straight and knowing which ‘M’ one this was without thinking about it.

The Academy of Saint Gabriel has an excellent article that discusses choosing a medieval name.

The Academy is a group of around 50 volunteers who research medieval names and armory. Our primary purpose is to assist members of medieval re-enactment groups like the Society for Creative Anachronism to find historically accurate medieval names and coats of arms. To this end, we maintain the Medieval Names Archive and Medieval Heraldry Archive.

https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/dietmar/hints.html

The History Girls also have an informative blog that discusses names in the medieval period.

https://the-history-girls.blogspot.com/2017/04/personal-names-in-historical-fiction.html

Historical fiction author Elizabeth Pye has a video clip on her site from an interview. (Go take a look – it’s short, just under two minutes.) One of the questions was about how she chose the names in her French novel. One additional piece of advice she has at the end is: “Do you like it? Does it seem to fit your character?”

If you’re writing a story set in the US, the Social Security Administration has a great searchable list by decades that begins in the 1880s.

Do you have any favorite methods for choosing your period character names?

 

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Comments on: "N: Names" (4)

  1. One resource I use is census records for a location and date. Also, for authenticity, I once used the name Mary for two characters along with a more unusual middle name. What trips me up is when an author uses the name Joseph Smith, then switches to Joseph and then switches to Joe.
    http://gail-baugniet.blogspot.com/
    (AtoZ Theme: very short stories/various genres)
    N is for: Narthex, Nave, and Exorcisms

    • Good idea about the census records Gail! And an excellent point about using the same name for two characters. How many times have we been in the same classroom with two (or three) of us with the same name?
      Why, working some some quilt squares from 1934, from women in the same town there are 2 Katie’s and 2 Leona’s.

  2. Ronel Janse van Vuuren said:

    Excellent! I’ve bookmarked this one to help with choosing names for my medieval characters 🙂

    Ronel visiting with the A-Z Challenge music and writing: More great music and lyrics

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