Where Dreams Meet the Business of Writing

Posts tagged ‘Trisha Faye’

Three Sites with an Abundance of Writing Tips

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Here are three sites with great resources of writing tips. They’ll keep you busy. Or scan the lists for some of the sites that are most helpful to you.

Writing Tips – The Best Writing Tips for Writers

Do you need tips to help you become a more productive writer? Do you need tips to help you write that next viral article? Below are some of the best writing tips on this blog.

  1. 10 Productivity Tips for Writers
  2. 9 Lessons I Learned in 8 Months of Writing for Income
  3. How to Write Great Content when You Don’t Feel Like It
  4. Two Ingredients of Awesome: Content and Metaphor
  5. How to Write Content that Gets Read

 

How to Write Your Memoir

“… 99.9 percent of people lead boring lives. But every single one of them is trying to make some sense out of his or her existence, to find some meaning in the world, and therein lies the value and opportunity of memoir. It’s therapeutic for the writer, and it eventually even helps his or her descendants understand themselves better.”

 

Tips From the Masters

You will find pearls of writing wisdom in these pithy lists by 21 masters of their craft, such as: Andrew Motion: 10 Techniques to Spark the Writing – Expert writing tips, Annie Proulx: 5 Techniques for Good Craftsmanship – Expert writing tips, or Billy Wilder: 10 Screenwriting Tips

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Wordless Wednesday

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Writing from a Different Gender Perspective

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Writing from a Different Gender Perspective

I have to admit it, my easiest characters are women, usually in the thirty to fifty year age range. Writing POV from a male perspective? That becomes difficult. (And they usually end up being too close to my ex for comfort.)

I was excited to see this post, Gender Bending: Writing a Different Gender Than Your Own, by Janice Hardy. She has some excellent advice about writing rich, dimensional characters of the other gender. Here’s two of her tips. Go check out Jane Hardy’s Fiction University for the full article.

Focus on the character, not the gender.

If you try to “write a woman who…” you might get stuck trying to be “a woman.” But write about “a character who…” and you’ll find yourself thinking more about what that character will do and how they’ll act in ways that fit the story and the situation. They’re a person first, a gender second.
Remember no two people are alike, regardless of gender.

“Men are like X” or “women always Y” don’t apply. My husband breaks all kinds of those rules, and I’m not your typical gal. Avoid the stereotypes and even have fun with them a little. Have men that love shoes, women who are rabid for sports. Let your men (or women) be as different from each other as they are from the opposite sex. A group of men won’t all have the same feelings about things, same as a group of anything won’t have the same feelings.

How is it for you? Can you write from the opposite gender’s perspective?

Five Minute Miracle – Guided Meditation

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Browsing through You Tube videos for guided meditations, I stumbled upon this one: The Five Minute Miracle. Intrigued, especially since it was only a five minute meditation, I had to check it out.

The focus of the meditation was about using your imagination to create a life full of what you desire. While it didn’t get very detailed, which naturally you can’t do in such a short time frame, it kept repeating the phrase ‘imagination’.

I wondered if this also couldn’t be applied to our writing. After all, isn’t that what our writing is? A world of words created on paper – a result of our writer’s imagination? My first thought was for the fictional tales I’m in the process of weaving. Yet, even non-fiction articles and books require our imagination and creative thought processes to write an intelligent, inspiring, and cohesive work.

Would this work to help open the doors of my imagination wider, prior to my writing session? I’m going to try it for a week. After all, what do I have to lose? It’s only five minutes. Every day this week, before I sit down to write, I’ll commit five minutes to listen this meditation.

Check it out. Take five minutes and see what you think. Do you think the Five Minute Miracle can help us with our writing goals too?

Z: Zen in Writing (Affirmations)

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Z: Zen

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  • Peace infuses me as I write.
  • The words flow easily from my fingertips.
  • I am one with my writing.
  • I am connected to the energy around me. This is reflected in my prose.
  • Like ripples in the water – my writing radiates outward to the people that need to see it.
  • Contemplation and meditation focuses my insight and brings clarity to my writing.
  • My intuition strengthens and my writing improves.
  • I am mindful. I focus on my words and story.
  • I focus on today. One step, one word, one day at a time.
  • I write. I pursue goals and dreams. I put forth my best effort. I am at peace with the outcome.
  • I, and my writing, are where I need to be.

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Y: Young Adult

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Y: Young Adult

Here’s a few affirmations for those that write in the Young Adult genre.

  • Memorable characters abound in my Young Adult writing.
  • The details I add bring my Young Adult novel to life.
  • My Young Adult voices are realistic.
  • My Young Adult books tell meaningful stories.
  • My Young Adult characters are well-developed and believable.
  • My Young Adult stories are diverse, imaginative, and unique.

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X: (E)Xperience

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X: EXPERIENCE

My experiences provide rich fodder for my writing.

My life experiences gives me wisdom.

Emotions from my own experiences are conveyed in my writing.

People I’ve met provide a wealth of negative and positive traits for my characters.

Experiences in my past make great building blocks in my stories.

I use what I know in my writing.

The world I know provides a wealth of writing material.

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