Where Dreams Meet the Business of Writing

Posts tagged ‘Writers Zen blog’

Celebrating the Yes’s and the No’s #ISWG

Today I’m writing for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group’s blog hop. This month we were asked, ‘When rejections feel overwhelming, what do you do to get yourself out of this negative funk?’

Oh no! This morning I wrote my October ISWG blog from a question I’d printed out September 20th. The event page had this question – which I wrote to.

October 4th – IWSG Blog Day — Optional Question: When rejections feel overwhelming, what do you do to get yourself out of this negative funk?

After the blog was written and scheduled, I saw another ISWG blog where that was written to a far different question. Going to the blog hop page, I saw this question – October 4 question – Have you ever slipped any of your personal information into your characters, either by accident or on purpose?

I know all is good. We don’t have to strictly follow the question of the month. But I wanted to clarify so if you read this and see the question I was writing to and then you go visit other blogs on the blog hop and see something totally different – that is why. (And by the way, the answer to the 2nd question is ‘Oh my, YES! But that’s a whole other blog post, so we’ll save that for another time.)

iwsg

Celebrating the Yes’s and the No’s

What I did then and what I do now are vastly different. I’d hope so. I would certainly wish that over the past few years I’ve grown as a writer, developed a thicker skin, and also grown in my personal and spiritual life. Which ultimately means if I’ve grown, I’ve also changed in the way I respond to many various life issues, only one of which is how I respond to rejections.

rejectedWhen I began freelancing several years ago, a single rejection wouldn’t devastate me. I knew it was part of the process – part of a writer’s life. But when I got several – okay, many – rejections in a week, and I think three within 24-hours, I crumbled. I laid on the bed and sobbed until I didn’t have a tear left. I took it personally. That many rejections all at one time meant I probably wasn’t going to pay the bills that month. I felt like a failure. For a week I wallowed in self-doubt and self-pity.

Fast forward a few years and now I’m not derailed like before. Occasionally I’ll still get waylaid for a day or two if the rejection I got was a publication that I greatly desired. But for most of them now, I shrug my shoulders, vow to send out another – or two or three – and I go on about the business of writing.

To keep my spirits up, sometimes I’ll do a search for popular writer’s rejections.

For a few instances, Authors.me, on their post Award-Winning, Best-Selling Authors Who Were Rejected, reported on these popular authors:

Zane Grey’s first experience getting paid for what he scribbled came when he sold a short story for ten dollars in 1902. His first novel, written the following winter, was not as successful, and when every publisher he submitted to rejected the work, his wife paid to have it published. The book did not turn a profit. If Grey was discouraged by this, he luckily got over the discouragement enough to become a prolific and widely-read author. The sales of his 90 or so books have exceeded 40 million copies.

Stephen King sounds downright proud of the number of times he was rejected as a young writer. In his On Writing, he says he pinned every rejection letter he received to his wall with a nail. “By the time I was fourteen,” he continues, “the nail in my wall would no longer support the weight of the rejection slips impaled upon it. I replaced the nail with a spike and went on writing.”

Robert M. Pirsig weathered an amazing 121 rejections before selling Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, a book now considered an American cultural icon.

Kathryn Stockett was turned down by 60 literary agents before she found someone willing to represent The Help. “Three weeks later,” she says, “we sold the book.” The Help later spent 100 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

H.G. Wells received a note in which the editor predicted, “I think the verdict would be, ‘Oh, don’t read that horrid book.’” Nevertheless, The War of the Worlds was published in 1898 and has not since gone out of print.

Still not convinced? Here’s a list of 50 authors who received repeated rejections, some over a lengthy period of many years, before they went on to become household names.

It puts it all in perspective. If they got rejections too, then I’m in good company. One little rejection – or two, or ten – doesn’t mean I’m a bad writer. What I submitted or queried simply doesn’t meet their needs for an array of possibilities.

Coincidentally – or serendipitously, as I don’t believe in accidents – I received an email this morning from WOW! Women on Writing. The subject was submissions and rejections. It referenced a column by Chelsey Clammer, and contained links to some of her columns:

Submit ‘Til You Make It, What My Submissions Spreadsheet Teaches Me, Hard-Working Writer Seeks Widely-Read Journal, Rejection Acceptance, Find or Fling? Figuring Out Where to Submit, Caring About Cover Letters, and How to Hold Your Horses, Breathe and Proceed, and Writing Contests: You Have Nothing to Lose.

I didn’t go read all of these yet – after all, I have a blog post to write and post for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group! But I did check out one that intrigued me the most – Rejection Acceptance. Chelsey interviewed author Jac Jemc, who has posted regular blogs since 2008 about her rejections and acceptances. Rejection Collection is a humorous, lighthearted approach to dealing with the downside that exists, whether writing is our career or our hobby.

Jac told Chelsey, “Posting the rejections on the blog really feels like a way of closing the door on the negative responses. Once I make the post, I’ll archive the email or file the letter, and that’s that. I look for a new place to send that story. Keeping the blog has really allowed the progress to become the focus rather than the rejection.”

Now that’s an attitude I endorse.

I may have to borrow her idea and tweak it for my own inspiration. But…hmmm…then I’d have to go back to my spreadsheet and actually count those pesky little critters. We’ll see. But for now, I’m off to read some more posts about how other writers handle rejections – something we all get.

Check out more Insecure Writer’s Support Group posts here.

 

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What I Should be Doing Today

typewriter

After a pathetic January, devoid of almost all written word, this is what I should be doing today. Instead i alternate between looking at my massive ‘To-Do’ list sitting on the desk beside my mouse and gazing out the window, as if my thoughts will bring about a warmer day.

All right – I talked myself into it. I’ll wallow in the depths of no writing for the rest of the day. Then tomorrow, bright and early, it’s back to business!

T: Time for Writers

A2Z-BADGE [2016]

T: TIME FOR WRITERS

Rich or poor, healthy or ill – we all get the same amount of time.

I choose to use part of my allotted time for my love of writing.

I consistently choose to use part of my daily time to write.

I may write, or I may brainstorm, research, outline, or edit.

I honor my writing by creating time in my day for my craft.

I am a writer. It is part of me.

Each day I honor my writing by creating time in my life for my craft.

Each day, every day, I write.

time to write_clock

time to write

C: Character Affirmations

A2Z-BADGE [2016]In participation with the A to Z Blog Challenge for 2016, Writer’s Zen is posting affirmations for writers in an A to Z theme. We’ll post every day during April, except Sunday’s – when we all get time off for good behavior.

I hope you enjoy these posts from Writer’s Zen. Check out some of the awesome blogs that are participating in the A to Z Challenge this year. There’s over 1700 blogs participating in the challenge, so I’m sure you’ll find some treasures in there.

My characters are believable and dimensional.

My characters have real lives.

My characters use all their senses. They see, smell, hear, taste and touch.

My characters are in motion. They act and move.

My characters keep my stories moving forward.

My characters have both flaws and admirable qualities.

My characters are memorable and have their own quirks.

My characters are realistic as they reveal themselves to the reader.

Character Affirmations

Today’s post is a selection from an upcoming book, Writer’s Zen: Affirmations for Writers. Come back and join us as we share affirmations for writers from A to Z.WZ_characters keep story moving forward

My characters are believable and dimensional.

My characters have real lives.

My characters use all their senses. They see, smell, hear, taste and touch.

My characters are in motion. They act and move.

My characters keep my stories moving forward.

My characters have both flaws and admirable qualities.

My characters are memorable and have their own quirks.

My characters are realistic as they reveal themselves to the reader.

Affirmations for Writers: Business

WZ_I respect my writing as a business.

Today’s post is a selection from an upcoming book, Writer’s Zen: Affirmations for Writers. Come back and join us as we share affirmations for writers from A to Z.

My writing is my business.

My words have value.

I respect my writing as a business.

I acknowledge the business aspects of my writing.

I am courteous and professional with my clients, agents, and editors.

I am organized.

I manage my paperwork in an efficient and timely manner.

I maintain proper records for my writing career, as one would in any business venture.

As a business person, I meet my deadlines.

I set goals for myself, and my writing business.

I easily prioritize my tasks for the day, accomplishing the most important things first.

 

The Wrong Target, by Sherry Gloag

Today we feature a guest – Sherry Gloag – with an excerpt from her book, The Wrong Target. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, check and see what havoc Cupid creates with the wrong target.

cupidWhen you look into the origins of Cupid it is something of a wonder that he ever came to represent the path of true love. It doesn’t matter whose folklore you follow – there is lust, love betrayal, jealousy and revenge all entwined.

Wow. Who knew those delightful and mischievous cherubs carry such a heavy legacy on their shoulders.

No wonder then that occasionally when they aim one of their arrows it misfires! As it did in my first Valentine novella, The Wrong Target, things begin to unravel.

The path of love certainly didn’t run smoothly for head teacher of an elite girls’ school, Tina Blackberry in The Wrong Target.

First the cherub in question misses his target and then one of the school girls shows off a priceless golden heirloom arrow, belonging to her father, which embeds itself in Tina’s desk …

And that’s just the start of her problems.

As far as Tina Blackberry is concerned those Cupid cherubs are full of revenge and still taking it out on their human counterparts. What she wouldn’t do to get her hands on one of those little guys.

The Wrong Target _Sherry GloagExcerpt from The Wrong Target:

“Goddamit,” he exploded, “Can’t you stand still for one second? I have something to say, but I can’t while you’re jogging round the room.”

She halted toe to toe in front of him. “You have me dismissed from a job I loved, because I upheld the safety of my pupils, and still have the audacity to stalk me to my holiday destination and demand I listen to you because you have something to say?” Flapping her hands at her sides, she spun away and back again, planting her hands on the chair arms, she pinned him in his place and snarled, “Let me tell you something. I’ve come here to enjoy myself and your presence isn’t part of my plan.”

“What is your plan?” he demanded.

“To get laid!”  Astonishment pushed her away from the chair, her eyes wide, her lips curved up in a defiant sneer. “I intend to find myself a man and screw the living daylights out of him. And,” she paused deliberately, “I don’t need you for that.”

 

Where can I get The Wrong Target?

eTreasures

Amazon.co.uk 

Amazon.com

Kobo

Amazon.com

Best-selling author, Sherry Gloag, is a transplanted Scot now living in the beautiful coastal countryside of Norfolk, England.  She considers the surrounding countryside as extension of her own garden, to which she escapes when she needs “thinking time” and solitude to work out the plots for her next novel.  While out walking she enjoys talking to her characters, as long as there are no other walkers close by.

Apart from writing, Sherry enjoys gardening, walking and reading. She cheerfully admits her books tend to take over most of the shelf and floor space in her workroom-cum-office.  She also finds crystal craft work therapeutic.

Sherry loves to hear from her readers.  sherrygloag@gmail.com

My Website: http://authorsherrygloagtheheartofroman.weebly.com/
My Blog: http://sherrygloagtheheartofromance.blogspot.com/
FB: https://www.facebook.com/SherryGloagAuthor
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/SherryGloag

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