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Archive for March, 2014

Fat and Sassy: Patsy arrives

Welcome to Tuesday Tales! This week we’re writing to the prompt ‘hug’.

For this scene in Fat and Sassy, we’re jumping ahead about ten years, but this is the scene where I wanted to use hug. Next week we’ll return to the 1940’s.

Return to TUESDAY TALES for more great story snippets using hug.

1958

Patsy_newborn

Newborn Patsy

The years passed. Mae and Luther got married, proving the sisters and all their teasing right. Mae worked at Monrovia Nursery to pay for the wedding, since the family didn’t have funds to provide for one. Over fifty years later, when Patsy, the first daughter was working at a nursery in Arizona, she would remember her mother’s Monrovia Nursery stories every time they received a shipment from the same nursery.

Bill was stationed in Germany. Helen was getting ready to graduate from high school. Tom and Ida were right behind, still in school but not in need of mothering. Alvin was twelve, technically the ‘baby’ of the house, still Bea’s Bubby-boy, yet he wasn’t a baby any longer either. Life was easier for Bea now, without a house full of little ones. She missed little ones, though. Her arms ached to hold babies. Babies; they were her favorite. She’d get a baby in her arms and she’d start rocking. She didn’t even need a rocking chair. But if she were in one, she the baby and the chair would all be moving, keeping time with the lullaby crooning from her lips.

She couldn’t wait to be a grandmother. Mae was trying her best, now that she and Luther were married.  She was trying again for a little one. Two still born babies later, she and the rest of the family were nervous about how this pregnancy would turn out.

Priscilla Elaine Cline, the first grandchild on each side, was still born on Christmas Day, 1955. A little over a year later, on January 30, 1957, Patrick Elvin Cline joined his sister (and their uncle Evan Lee) at Oakdale Cemetery in Glendora.

The two young babies, who never drew a breath, brought back horrid memories of Evan Lee dying at such a young age. Bea remembered the pain of losing a baby. Mae had her own nightmares about Evan Lee that would plague her for years. And now she’d lost two babies. Bea and Mae had something in common. They had something in common that no mother ever wants to share.

Dr. Hightower, who had delivered Patrick and Priscilla, along with Evan Lee fourteen years earlier, and Luther and Gerald Cline years earlier than that, advised Mae not to try to have any more babies for at least five years. “Your body has to rest,” she said.

Mae’s new doctor, Dr. Bostwick, advised the same. “You’ll never have a normal baby,” he said.

Against medical advice from both doctors, one more was on the way. The old adage ‘third times a charm’ often came to mind. But most didn’t want to say it and bring bad luck with its utterance.

Patsy_and grandma J

Patsy and Grandma Jones

The morning of June 20th dawned with Mae in the midst of delivery. The physical pain was nothing compared to the pain of the possibility that she knew from two previous pregnancies. Would the doctors be right? Would this child die too? Was she doomed to the proclamation that she’d never deliver a normal baby? Hours later the doctor’s claims would be shot down. Patricia Faith Cline drew her first breath … and kept on breathing. Faith, her middle name, held Mae and Luther strong through the pregnancy. Faith held them together and the baby would carry the namesake with her for her whole life.

Bea and Casey were quick to arrive at the hospital once Casey got home from work that Friday afternoon. They were grandparents now. They stood and looked through the glass sentry, keeping them away from the fragile newborns camped out in the hospital bassinets. Bea stood, gazing at her granddaughter with pride. “I can’t wait until the baby comes home and I can wrap her up in a great big hug!”

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Fat and Sassy: Riding the Red Car

It’s TUESDAY TALES. This week, we’re writing to a picture prompt. 300 words only, so the scenes will be short. Return to TUESDAY TALES for more great snippets, in a variety of genres.

TT_ornate mirrorThis scene is from my WIP, Fat and Sassy. This scene is based a true slice of life (story compliments of my mother as a girl). She and her friend Francie did occasionally ride the electric car, The Red Car, into Monrovia to visit Francie’s mother at work at JC Penny’s. The Pacific Electric Railway never turned around. When it got to its final destination in LA, it simply reversed direction and headed back to Glendora. Service on the Pasadena and Monrovia/Glendora lines was terminated in 1951, due to new freeway construction in the area. The conversation the two girls had — pure fiction on my part. My dad jokes that my memory of events that happened before I was born is phenomenal.

***********************************

“C’mon, we’re gonna be late.” Mae tugged at Francie’s hand. “If we miss the Red Car, I’ll be late for dinner and my Mama won’t be happy.”glendora rail car - color

“Just a minute,” Francie said, turning her head for once last glance in the ornate mirror behind the JC Penny’s counter. She tucked a loose strand of hair behind her ear “She’d understand, though, wouldn’t she? After all, it’s not like we ride the street car into Monrovia very often.”

“No, we don’t. But I don’t think that matters to Mama. I’m lucky she even let me come with you. Usually I have to be home on Saturdays doing the dishes or watching Alvin Dale.”

“I sure am lucky I don’t have any younger brothers or sisters. It seems like you’re always watching him. You have to take Alvin everywhere with you. I’m surprised you didn’t have to bring him with us today.”

“That’s only because Mama didn’t want to have to pay an extra dime for him to ride the street car. Plus, she knew we were coming in to see your mom at work and she probably knew it would be more fuss for your mother if we had him with us.”

The girls headed out the door to stand by the rail car station, waiting to board for the return trip to Glendora.

“It is too bad, though,” Mae said. “He would have liked to see how the cup and pulley system takes the money and the order upstairs, then they send the change back down to the counter in the same contraption. That’s kind of neat. They don’t have anything fancy like that in the stores in downtown Glendora.”

glendora old pulley cash system

Author Spotlight: Robin Marvel

robin marvel_speakingToday Writer’s Zen welcomes author Robin Marvel as our guest. Robin is the author of several books focusing on self development and self-esteem. Her newest book, Life Check, contains inspirational tips and steps to improve the quality of anyone’s life.

Robin, you are very open about your less than perfect childhood and you own up to how with your own choices you were a teen mother. You don’t use your past to place the blame on anyone else. With your inner strength and the convictions you have, you chose not to repeat the cycles you grew up with. You’ve succeeded and you use your life to encourage and inspire others. You’re now a motivational speaker (getting busier month by month!) and you’re a published author with five books. 

What was it that gave you the courage to break free from your past and step out into new territory?

My courage to break out of my past and into new territory really came from the desire to live a better life than I grew up in.  I made the choice to not repeat the pattern because I wanted more for myself and especially for my own children.   

How did you discover that you wanted to write your first book?

I discovered I wanted to write my first book because I homeschool my five daughters and I wanted to give them something that focused on building strong self-esteem and something that was really hands on so they had to be involved with the empowerment of their own lives.  I searched for a book but I was unable to find what I was looking for so I decided to write it!

Did your writing lead you into speaking? Or, your speaking into writing?

My writing inspired my speaking.  I started doing hands-on workshops that get people up and active in their own empowerment.  I am all about getting people on their feet, having fun while adding confidence and personal strength!

I see that helping the homeless is one of your passions. You frequently post about food drives and outreach programs that you’re involved in. How did this mission become important to you?

Helping the homeless is a huge passion of mine.  It is so important to me because growing up we were homeless many times and I made the decision when I was in 3rd grade that I would be a helping hand for the homeless.  My goal is not just be a hand out but a hand up by teaching confidence, self-esteem and worth to the homeless.  Giving them a reason to start believing in themselves so they will see and live their potential.  Sometimes people just need a reminder to realize how amazing they really are and that they deserve a great life.

If people aren’t near your local area, are there ways that your readers and followers can help you in your pursuits there?

Everyone can be of help in their own areas as well in my missions. I take donations for the IMPACT kits we supply to the homeless.  The most important way people can help in by taking action in their own areas.  Be the change!

Do you have any advice to encourage people in ways to reach out to their own local community to help others in need?

The best advice to those who want to help is to take action!  You have to get out there and get involved.  There are so many small ways to help those in need. Never underestimate what you can do. Just dropping food off at your local pantry helps put food on someone’s table.  Stop talking and start doing!

In your most recent book, Life Check, you have 7 Steps to Balance Your Life.

* Rock the boat
* Leave your baggage
* Raise the bar
* Push the limits
* Setting life in motion
* Lose sight of the shore
* Live today to create tomorrow

If you had to choose one to implement over all the others, which one would you choose?

It is hard to just choose one because they are all so powerful in the balancing of your life!  They work hand in hand.

What would you like us to know about Life Check?

Life Check is written for everyday people that the world belongs to, the people like you and I who are working every day to live passionately and to experience a life full of happiness, success and joy.  It provides many tried and true methods that I learned the hard way- you know, the old school was of trial and error.  Now I want to share them with you so you can skip the trial and error, wasting no time and start to experience joy, passion and happiness in your daily living.

robin marvel_books banner

Where can people find you and your books?

Robin Marvel

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Robin, thank you for joining us today and sharing your heart with us. You’re a phenomenal woman and I’m glad that our lives have crossed in this life. Keep living, loving, growing, and inspiring us all.

Thank you so much for allowing me the opportunity to share with you.  Keep Being Amazing!!

Fat and Sassy: Jones and Clines at church

Welcome to TUESDAY TALES. This week we’re writing to the prompt ‘nudge’. Return to TUESDAY TALES for more fun stories using this unusual prompt.

This WIP, Fat and Sassy, continues with the Jones family on their way to the stone church in Glendora. Living only two blocks from the church, the family walked. It was easier than trying to get the family of eight loaded in the car for a two block drive.

stone churchThe Jones family filed out the front door. Bea and Casey led the way, followed by a line of little chicklings. Mae was next in line, right behind her parents, her two sisters following behind her, laughing and pointing. Tom and Bill brought up the rear, lagging further behind with each block.

“See,” Helen said, giggling. She pointed to Mae’s behind. “See that swing Mae’s got.” She started swinging her hips from side to side, in an exaggerated manner.

Ida laughed. “Mae’s got a wiggle, Mae’s got a wiggle,” she called in a sing-song voice.

Mae stopped and turned to her sisters, her hand poised on her hip. “Stop it you two!”

Helen kept it up, singing her own little ditty, “Mae’s got a swing in her seat.”

Mae frowned at her sisters. “Ugh! I am so glad we’re in different Sunday School classes. You two can be so annoying.”

“Annoying? We’re annoying to Miss Hoity Toity,” Helen continued with her pestering.

“Girls,” Bea turned and called to the girls now far behind her. “That’s enough. Get yore bottoms up here and stop yore fighting.”

The lagging children scurried to catch up with their parents.

At the end of the block the gray stone church stood imposing on the corner of Glendora Avenue and Whitcomb Avenue. The boys broke into a run, across the green lawn Casey had just mowed the afternoon before. “I’m climbing on the wall first,” Tom called out.

“No you’re not. I am,” Bill called out as he moved into faster gear, taking over the lead. The girls scampered after them.

“At least they’ll git some energy out before church,” Bea said to Casey. She shifted Alvin to her other hip.

The family split into different directions. The children headed towards their different Sunday School rooms. Bea headed to the nursery to deposit Alvin for safekeeping. Casey headed towards the suited men standing in the foyer outside the main worship room.

“Brother Casey,” the pastor said, meeting him with hand outstretched.

“Morning Reverend Cline. How are you?”

The men continued their Sunday morning social ritual, much like the women gathering in their seats, catching up on the happenings in their lives and comparing notes with each other.

The individual classes came to a close and families started to gather in the main church for services. The Jones children joined their family in their usual pew, one by one, as Mildred, the pastor’s wife, softly played ‘In the Garden’, her favorite hymn.

The three girls sat next to each other. Helen nudged Mae and pointed to pew where the three Cline boys sat. “See, Luther is watching you. I told you he always watches you. He likes you.”

“He does not,” Mae insisted. “He’s looking at all of us.”

“Nope. He’s watching you,” Helen repeated.

As Mildred started playing ‘The Old Rugged Cross’, Cecil rose and headed towards the pulpit.

“Girls,” Bea hissed, “Hush!” Her hand reached down the pew towards the closest ear, which happened to be Ida’s, although she saw it coming and ducked out of reach before her ear got the familiar Sunday morning twist for misbehavior.

Cecil stepped behind the pulpit, hymnal in hand. “Good morning. Please turn to page 33 in your hymnal and join us in song.”

Inspirational Quote Of The Day

Fat and Sassy: Gettin’ ready for church

Welcome to TUESDAY TALES. This week we’re writing to the prompt ‘end’. Return to TUESDAY TALES for more great story snippets.

My WIP, Fat and Sassy, continues as the Jones Family heads to the stone church in Glendora.

green beansThe next morning Bea roused all the children from their slumber. “Rise and Shine!”

“I wanna sleep,” Bill whined.

“Me took,” Ida chimed in from her bed.

“Don’t give me no sass,” Bea hollered down the hall. “Up and at em! Come eat yore breakfast so we can get cleaned up and head to church.

Tom, the ornery little stinker that he was, was already up and playing, rifling through Bill’s things.

Bill woke up enough to finally realize what Tom was looking through. “Get outta my stuff!” he yelled. With all the commotion, Alvin woke up and started crying.

“Mae, git a bottle for your brother,” Bea yelled.

Helen stood in the bathroom, brushing her hair, oblivious to the confusion.

Everyone finally made their way to the kitchen. As the children sat, eating their oatmeal, Bea was busy in front of the stove, snapping green beans to fill up the Dutch oven. She added a large spoon full of bacon grease into the pot, stirred it in, and placed the cast iron lid on top.

“Dad,” she said to her father, who sat sipping coffee from his saucer. “I’m gonna leave the beans cooking on low while we’re at church. Can you check on it now and then, and make sure it doesn’t boil dry.”

“Shore nuff,” Papa replied. “I reckon I can handle that chore.”

Somehow, all the children ended up in clean clothes, with clean faces and slicked down hair. “Tom, c’mere,” Bea said. He walked over and in a flash, before he knew what happened, she licked her thumb and wiped a smudge off his cheek. “There, that’s the end of that.”

Bea picked up her purse and slid it down to the crook of her elbow. “Casey, carry my Bible,” she commanded, handing her worn leather bound Bible to her husband. She lifted little Evan up to her hip. “C’mon children,” she called. “We need to git on the road iffn’ we’re gonna get to Sunday School on time.”

Fat and Sassy: Finkbiner’s Market

Welcome to TUESDAY TALES. This week, we’re writing to the prompt ‘pale’. Check out the story snippets and see the wide variety of how the different genres have used ‘pale’.

In Fat and Sassy, Bea and Casey are living an ordinary life in the 1940’s, raising children and living in a small suburban southern California town, trying to keep the family fed, clothed, and sheltered. Little did they know then, that the places they spent their time would end up being “historic sites” in the future. Then, they were simply places to shop and worship.

Summer 1948

glendora_old picBea slipped a fried egg onto Casey’s plate. “When’s yore next paycheck? We need some things from the store.”

“This Friday. It’s going to be short though.”

“That’s right. All that rain the past two weeks. Its shore messed things up for a lot of people.”

“Sure has,” Casey agreed. “I’m just glad our house isn’t one of those at the base of the foothills. A lot of them are plumb messed up from the mud slides.”

“Worst it’s ever been since we’ve lived here. Those wild fires last year didn’t help, burning out all the undergrowth we usually have.” The toaster popped and Bea pulled two pieces of slightly charred toast from it. Picking up a knife, she scraped some of the charred surface into the sink before buttering the toast and handing it to her husband.

“The foothills shore are a pretty sight to see every morning, especially in winter when the top of Mt. Baldy is covered in snow. We can be thankful for our view, even if we don’t have enough money all the time.”

“A nice view doesn’t put food in our belly though,” Bea said.

“True enough. True enough.” Casey ate a few bites of toast before asking, “So, are you a wantin’ to run downtown for shopping? Or just over to the little green store?”

“I’d like to go downtown to trade,” Bea answered. “Bolton’s Market is fine for a loaf of bread or some bologna. The odd items here and there. They’re a little dear sometimes, price wise. Finkbiner’s Market has much better prices.”

“All righty then, Finkbiner’s it is. I’ll stop at the bank on the way home Friday and we’ll go shopping Saturday.”

Saturday morning, just as promised, Casey and Bea headed out. “Keep an eye on yore brothers and sisters,” Bea reminded Mae. “Papa’s in back iffin’ you need anything.

Casey eased the car around the corner and headed south on Vista Bonita. Passing the back side of the Church of the Brethren on their way downtown, he said, “This afternoon I need head on down to the church and mow. Brother Ernest is sick and I said I’d fill in for him and get the lawns mowed and tidied up for church tomorrow.”

Two blocks further he turned right on Meda, then right on Glendora Avenue. He pulled up in a parking space across the street from Finkbiner’s.

finkbiners market“The store shore does look purty, after the work they did a year or so ago.” Bea picked up her pocketbook and stepped out onto the sidewalk. “I like the new plastered front. But I kind of miss the old stone walls. I think that’s one reason I like going to the Brethren Church. I like the way the building is made out of all those large gray stones.”

They stepped inside the familiar market and headed to get basket. “Hi ya, Joe,” Casey called to the owner, who was pacing the produce area, surveying the offerings and making notes on a small pad.

Joe waved. “Hello Casey. Hello Bea. How are you doing this fine sunny Saturday morning?”

“Oh, I’m just fat and sassy, as usual,” Bea answered.

“Where are all the little ones?”

“They’re home with Mae,” Casey said. “And with Papa. He’ll keep ‘em outta trouble.”

“I have no doubt he will,” Joe said, laughing and shaking his head. “Now, you let me know if you need anything. Or, one of the girls. I think Bernadette is up on the register right now.”

“Will do, will do,” Casey said. Turning to Bea, he asked, “Now Mother, what is it you needed while we’re here.”

Bea opened her pocketbook and rummaged around. “My list is here somewhere.” Not finding it she started naming off what she could remember, “Potatoes, maybe a few onions, coffee, we’re low on sugar … flour we’re good on … I’ll make some biscuits for supper … Oh! Green beans. I want to cook up a mess of green beans tomorrow …”

Casey leaned over a display of shiny tomatoes. “You want some tomatoes too? Some sliced tomatoes would be awful tasty with those green beans.”

“I suppose we could get one or two. If they’re not too dear.” She leaned in close to whisper, “They shore look pale compared to what we used to grow back home, don’t they?”

“Now Mother, they don’t have that good ole’ Ozark dirt you grew up with. We’re not back home anymore. We’re in Cali-for-ny-a,” he reminded Bea.

A wistful sigh escaped Bea’s lips. “I know. I’m happy here in Glendora, but some days the Midwest just tugs at my heart and I miss it.”

“Maybe someday we’ll go back,” Casey said. “C’mon. Let’s finish up the shopping and get out of here before we run out of money.”

They wandered through the aisles, picking up the necessities and eyeing a few luxuries that would remain sitting on the shelves. Bea darted around a corner and returned holding a small cellophane bag fill with orange colored pieces. “Here, we need a bag of your favorite candy,” she held up the marshmallow peanuts.

Casey’s eyes brightened. “Now, I won’t turn those down. I do enjoy one or two of those in the evening.”

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